Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics

Published by: Kowsar

Oral Diphenhydramine-Midazolam Versus Oral Diphenhydramine for Pediatric Sedation in the Emergency Department

Samad EJ Golzari 1 , Kavous Shahsavari Nia 2 , Majid Sabahi 3 , 4 , Hassan Soleimanpour 5 , * , Ata Mahmoodpoor 6 , Saeid Safari 7 and Nooshin Milanchian 8
Authors Information
1 Medical Philosophy and History Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
2 Emergency Medicine Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
3 Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Ottawa, Canada
4 Sunny Brook Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
5 Cardiovascular Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
6 Anesthesiology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
7 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
8 Bone Research Center, Endocrine Section, Imam Reza Medical Research and Training Hospital, Tabriz, IR Iran
Article information
  • Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics: February 01, 2014, 5 (1); e17946
  • Published Online: February 25, 2014
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: February 1, 2014
  • Revised: February 16, 2014
  • Accepted: February 23, 2014
  • DOI: 10.17795/compreped-17946

To Cite: Golzari S E, Shahsavari Nia K, Sabahi M, Soleimanpour H, Mahmoodpoor A, et al. Oral Diphenhydramine-Midazolam Versus Oral Diphenhydramine for Pediatric Sedation in the Emergency Department, J Compr Ped. 2014 ; 5(1):e17946. doi: 10.17795/compreped-17946.

Abstract
Copyright © 2014, Iranian Society of Pediatrics. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Patients and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 4.0 International License .

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